Necrotizing soft tissue infection

23 January 2018
Comments: 0
23 January 2018, Comments: 0

Necrotizing soft tissue infection is an uncommon form infection caused by bacteria or fungi that leads to the damage of the skin, muscles and soft tissue.

The bacteria or fungi might gain entry to the body as well as multiply rapidly which leads to the destruction of the body tissues. Depending on the site where infection develops, loss of tissue can be localized or widespread. Remember that in most cases, the destruction of the tissue is accompanied by other dangerous conditions including septic shock and multiple organ failure.

Even though both men and women of all ages are prone to the condition, those over the age of 50 years old are at higher risk.

Risk factors

The common risk factors for necrotizing soft tissue infection typically include:

  • Intravenous drug use
    Necrotizing soft tissue infection

    Remember that in most cases, the destruction of the tissue is accompanied by other dangerous conditions including septic shock and multiple organ failure.

  • Open wounds
  • Malnutrition
  • Recent surgery
  • Diminished immune function
  • Chronic health conditions

What are the indications of necrotizing soft tissue infection?

Generally, the symptoms that might manifest include the following:

  • Reddened or purplish swollen skin
  • Widespread pain
  • Reopening of wounds with drainage of fluid or pus
  • Fever and chills
  • Nausea and/or vomiting
  • Weakness
  • Rapid heart rate
  • Shock
  • Toxic delirium

Management

When managing necrotizing soft tissue infection, antibiotics might be generally administered intravenously. This helps eliminate the bacteria as well as avert further spread in the body.

  • The loss of fluid via diarrhea or vomiting can be replaced with intravenous fluids.
  • Surgical intervention might be an option to drain the site of infection and get rid of any dead tissues.
  • In case of systemic infection, immunoglobulins might be given to manage the infection.

In severe instances, grafting of the skin or an amputation might be required.

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