Subconjunctival hemorrhage

5 April 2018
Comments: 0
5 April 2018, Comments: 0

A subconjunctival hemorrhage occurs once a small blood vessel in the white part of the eye ruptures. The ensuing redness can intensify over 24-48 hours especially among those who use blood thinners or aspirin. Generally, it subsides on its own within 1-2 weeks.

The bleeding can be brought about by eye injuries, straining during bowel movements or forceful vomiting, coughing or sneezing. Using blood thinners such as warfarin or aspirin might increase the risk. Nevertheless, there is no precise case most of the time.

What are the signs?

Generally, the individual is not aware of having a subconjunctival hemorrhage unless he/she looks in a mirror or someone tells that his/her eye is red.

Subconjunctival hemorrhage

The bleeding can be brought about by eye injuries, straining during bowel movements or forceful vomiting, coughing or sneezing.

Some experience a minor, scratchy sensation in the eye. In most cases, the condition will not affect vision.

The doctor will ask about the symptoms and assess the eyes. Generally, no tests are required. If this occurs frequently, a blood test might be carried out to check for any bleeding issues.

Management of subconjunctival hemorrhage

In most cases, treatment is not necessary. Take note that the redness in the eye usually settles within 1-3 weeks. The affected eye might turn yellowish before it turns white again as the blood is being absorbed.

The doctor might recommend using artificial tear eye drops if the affected eye feels scratchy.

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