Allergies: Does my child have carrot allergy?

Carrot allergy is an uncommon type of food allergy. Generally, carrots are least likely to trigger an allergic reaction, but an allergy to any food should be considered. Once a child is suspected to be highly sensitive or allergic to carrots or experiences an allergic reaction, a doctor should be consult as soon as possible.

Close look on food allergies

When a child is given a new food that he/she might be allergic to, the symptoms of an allergy are not likely to show. During the first encounter, the body identifies the food as an invader and produces antibodies to fight it.

On the second encounter with the food, the body detects the food and the immune system will trigger an attack which leads to the manifestation of the allergy symptoms. Some of the reactions to food including carrots are barely obvious, such as fussiness or gas. In some cases though, the symptoms can be life-threatening such as a swollen throat.

Symptoms of carrot allergy

Once a child has carrot allergy, he/she will experience some physical indications such as the following:

  • Hives
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Runny nose
    Carrot allergy
    In case the child is at risk for experiencing a severe carrot allergy, the doctor might prescribe an epinephrine auto-injector that can stop the reactions upon administration.
  • Sneezing
  • Fatigue
  • Fussiness
  • Coughing
  • Gas
  • Abdominal pain

When introducing food to an infant, it is recommended to wait until at least 7 months old to give cooked carrots and at least 10 months old for grated raw carrots. If carrot is given at an earlier age and the child ends up with an allergic reaction, a doctor should be consulted about reintroducing carrots as his/her system matures.

What to do during emergencies?

If the infant experiences swelling in the face or lips, difficulty breathing or severe vomiting or diarrhea after eating, seek medical care right away. If unclear whether the situation is an emergency, call for emergency assistance right away.

Always remember that it is best to play safe since the airway can become swollen and close in just minutes of consuming an allergen. In case the child is at risk for experiencing a severe carrot allergy, the doctor might prescribe an epinephrine auto-injector that can stop the reactions upon administration.

When to consult a doctor

An allergist should be consulted to determine if the child has carrot allergy or to other foods as well as provide recommendations for a safe diet and how to properly handle future reactions.

Some infants experience a reaction to a particular food since their digestive system is not yet mature enough to process the food while others have an actual allergic reaction. An allergist will perform tests to check which condition is triggering the symptoms.

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