Fibula fracture

An acute fibula fracture occurs in the inferior leg due to direct injury or an impact to the ankle or leg. It is important to note that stress fractures can also occur from overuse or activities involving repetitive impacts. This type of fracture is likely to occur while engaging in certain sports. If an individual is suspected with a fibula fracture, being prepared to provide first aid care is vital in order to prevent further damage as well as hasten the healing process. To learn to recognize and manage bone and muscle injuries, register for a first aid course today.

Symptoms

The symptoms of an acute fibula fracture include abrupt acute pain in the lower leg that is accompanied by rapid swelling usually after an impact, fall or collision. The individual is likely to limp or unable to bear weight on the affected leg.

There is tenderness around the fracture site. In severe cases, there is deformity in the area where the bones were displaced. It is also possible that the individual can continue to engage in sports even with a fibula fracture.

The symptoms of a fibula stress fracture tend to include the gradual build-up of pain on the exterior part of the lower leg which can be relieved by rest and increases with activity. It is usually tender over the area of the fracture and there is aching or throbbing pain experienced by the individual at night.

Fibula fracture
The symptoms of an acute fibula fracture include abrupt acute pain in the lower leg that is accompanied by rapid swelling usually after an impact, fall or collision.

A close look on a fibula fracture

It is important to note that the fibula is the smaller of the two shin bones on the exterior of the lower leg. It can be felt as the bony bump on the exterior of the ankle which is called the lateral malleolus and travels to the exterior of the leg to the knee. It is responsible for providing a surface for the muscles to connect to while the tibia is responsible for supporting most of the weight of the body.

In case of traumatic fractures to the fibula, they typically develop along with a severe ankle sprain. An avulsion fracture occurs once a ligament yanks part of the bone away. A fracture on the bony bit on the exterior of the ankle or malleolus is known as Pott’s fracture.

As for stress fractures of the fibula, they can oftentimes occur but less common than the stress fractures of the tibia. Remember that the fibula is not a weight-bearing bone and likely to be triggered by constant muscle traction forces on the bone.

Once an individual is suspected with a fibula fracture, it is important to consult a doctor for proper assessment of the condition so that timely treatment can be started as soon as possible to help hasten the healing process.

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