How to manage rugby injuries

Rugby is one of the popular sports in the world. This sport gained popularity in both young and adult players globally. Just like with any sport, there are various types of rugby injuries that you should be familiar with.

Rugby is a sport that demands the endurance and running of soccer along with tackling and contact similar to American football. Due to the running, there is the risk for overuse injuries such as bursitis and tendinitis. In most circumstances, traumatic rugby injuries can occur during collision with other players or the ground during tackling, rucking and scrumming.

Overuse injuries in rugby

Since rugby involves a lot of running, certain rugby overuse injuries such as tendinitis in the ankle or knee, bursitis and medial tibial stress syndrome can develop. Even though these are not considered serious injuries, they can affect the performance of the individual drastically and possibly result to complicated issues if not properly managed by a sports medicine professional.

Rugby injuries
Knee injuries such as anterior cruciate and medial collateral ligament sprains as well as meniscus tears can occur due to the contact forces or rotational forces during abrupt changes in direction.

Traumatic rugby injuries

Due to the high risk for collisions in rugby, traumatic injuries are likely to occur in the sport. These traumatic rugby injuries include dislocated fingers and elbows, fractured bones, sprained ligaments, cuts, strained tendons or muscles as well as deep muscle bruises. In addition, there is also an increased risk for facial fractures, especially the nose since there are no helmets used.

Knee injuries such as anterior cruciate and medial collateral ligament sprains as well as meniscus tears can occur due to the contact forces or rotational forces during abrupt changes in direction.

Shoulder injuries from contact with other players or the ground include sprains on the acromioclavicular joint or glenohumeral joint dislocations. Since players do not use any form of protective mask, cuts on the face are quite common. In addition, the players are easily injured during tackles since protective body pads are not used.

Concussions

Just like with any sport that involves contact and speed, concussions can occur. The possible indications of a concussion include dizziness, confusion, blurred vision, forgetfulness and headaches.

Many players might attempt to continue even after sustaining a concussion. Nevertheless, an individual with a possible concussion must be removed from practice or competition. Proper assessment is vital and a clearance must be given by the doctor.

Management of rugby injuries

When recovering from rugby injuries, there are vital things to consider. Just like with most sports, regaining strength and flexibility after sustaining an injury is vital to a successful rehabilitation.

Shoulder, neck, core and hip strength as well as flexibility of the hip flexors and hamstrings are vital for overall conditioning and can reduce the chances of sustaining a secondary injury. Due to the continuous moving nature of rugby, developing a high level of endurance has a big role in the effectiveness of the player returning from rugby injuries.

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