Specific Triangular Bandages

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There are three main types of triangular bandages: arm sling, elevation sling,

Specific Triangular Bandages
Specific Triangular Bandages

and collar-and-cuff sling, each with different ways to create a sling.

The three main types of triangular bandages: arm sling, elevation sling, and collar-and-cuff sling. There are several ways to create a triangular bandage, due to the many different uses of a triangular bandage. Each sling will have a particular way of making them.

Triangular Bandages: Arm Sling

The arm sling is generally used to support a lower arm or hand injury. Moreover, this type of triangular bandage can also be used for rib or collarbone fractures.

  • Assist the victim in holding the affected arm across the body with the fingers pointing to the uninjured shoulder tip. Make sure that the position is the most comfortable position for the victim.
  • Initially hold the bandage with the base running down the centre of the body and the point to the elbow on the injured side. Carefully slip the top point under the supported arm and wrap it around the nape until it rests on the shoulder of the uninjured side.
  • Lift up the lower point and bring it to meet the upper point at the side of the neck on the injured side.
  • Tie the ends together just above the clavicles using a reef knot. Ensure that there is no pressure on the back of the neck.
  • Alter the sling such that the fingertips are clearly visible and the bring the point forward and fasten it to the sling with a safety pin.
  • Ensure that the sling is not causing poor circulation of the blood to the fingertips.

Triangular Bandages: Elevation Sling

This particular type of triangular bandage is used for arm or finger injuries where there is a particular need to keep the injured area in an elevated position, thus calling it an elevation sling.

  • Assist the victim in holding the affected arm across the body with the fingers pointing to the uninjured shoulder tip.
  • Initially hold the bandage with the base running down the centre of the body and the point to the elbow on the injured side. Carefully place the bandage over the affected arm and carry the top end around the front of the neck until it rests on the uninjured side.
  • Carefully wrap the lower half of the bandage along the injured arm. Get the free end of the bandage from the elbow across the back to the uninjured shoulder tip.
  • Lightly twist the top point around the fingers, whilst ensuring that no pressure is placed on the injury. Using a reef knot, tie the two ends. Place above the collarbone.
  • To secure the sling, use a safety pin or tape at the point of the elbow smooth along the loose fabric.

Triangular Bandages: Collar-and-cuff Sling

The collar-and-cuff sling is mainly used to hold the lower arm and hand in an elevated position, regardless of necessity of a full elevation. This can also be used in very hot weathers.

  • Create a clove hitch with the two large hoops of the bandage. Create a loop by pointing the bandage end upwards and the other end pointing downwards.
  • Fold two loops inwards, towards the middle. Make sure that both ends are trapped between loops.
  • Assist the victim in holding the affected arm across the body with the fingers pointing to the uninjured shoulder tip. Smoothly slide the two loops over the hand and lower arm with the ends hanging downwards.
  • Carry the two bandage ends up on either side of the limb and around the patient’s neck. Tie a reef knot above the collarbone on either side, wherever it is comfortable for the victim. Ensure that there is no pressure on the neck.

Disclaimer: The information from this article does not provide medical advice and should not be substituted for formal training. Seek medical attention when necessary. To learn more about to how to make specific triangular bandages, enrol in First Aid Courses and CPR Courses with workplace approved Training.

Online Sources:

http://www.stjohn.org.nz/en/First-Aid/First-Aid-Library/Immediate-First-Aid1/Dressings-and-Bandages/

 

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